Baby steps in data visualization

Baby steps in data visualization

So, in my last post months ago, I resolved to learn better ways of visualizing data online than creating graphs in Excel and posting them as images. Resolution kept! I had another go with the food price data, using one of the new tools I’ve been playing around with. I still have a tonne to learn, and it seems like there is a lot of innovation in this area. No one tool is perfect but after reading a bit on the Guardian’s Data Blog I’ve been playing around with Tableau Public (for maps and interactive charts) and Google’s Fusion tables (for maps). Google Chart Wizard seems wonky to me; when I’ve entered data—even for a simple bar graph—it built the graph but not accurately. Probably I don’t know how to work it yet. As for the other tools, I’m learning as I go. Anyway, here’s a second go at the food prices chart, with updated (to Dec. 2011) food price data from Statistics Canada. (Here’s the link to the newest data, which may have already been updated since I built the chart.) Any more suggestions on data visualization tools? Powered by...

Food prices, visualized

People seemed interested in the food price information in my last post, so here’s a few more figures from that same Statistics Canada data, put in a chart. I really wish I had a better tool for visualizing data on the web than Excel — that will have to go on a to-do list. Anyone have any suggestions? Click through to see the chart… Change in average food prices in Canada The latest data available show food prices for each October for 2007-2011. So, I calculated percent change for the past year, and the past four years. Because the x-axis is so far down, I popped on a couple of the 1-year numbers to make it more clear. And income? For most people, are not growing at the same pace. For example, in B.C. the average hourly wages went up 2.3% in the past year (not adjusted for inflation). Some groups did much better: managers’ wages on average went up 7%, certain industries saw wages go up 12%. Others did worse: young workers (15-24) saw their average hourly wages...